Waiting for opening time …

Well, when the cats away the mice will …, trying out some product photography with this nice bottle of Old Perth whisky. Just keeping amused you know 🙂

Bottle of whisky
Old Perth

The times they are a changing

So now that the winter weather seems to be receding, for the moment at least, some flowers have started to brave poking above the ground and here is a collage of some crocuses which I found on the North Inch in Perth today when I was out for a stroll.


Back where I belong…

So I got a Christmas present of a DNA kit to investigate my heritage, it seems after reading the report that I am from mostly Scandinavian stock, some Irish, Scottish and Welsh and even English.


 Scandinavian 45.3%
Irish, Scottish, and Welsh
 English 19.2%
 Greek 5.6%
Nigerian 1.0%
North African 0.9%

Map of DNA sources
DNA Profile

The upshot is I am predominantly Norseman lineage, I’m not the best sailor in the world so god knows how I ended up here!

Up a hill we go.

Well the weather is certainly doing it’s thing at the moment, today a good lot of snow falling and more to come, just the kind of weather where I wish I had a nice 4×4 Landrover (other 4×4 models are available!) rather than a small mini cooper; not the kind of transport to be driving out and about in this kind of weather.

So I decided to use version 1.0 mode of transport, my legs, and took a walk up Kinoull hill which is not far from home, its usually around a 45 min walk but in this weather took a little over an hour. Exhausted, I eventually arrived at the top where the views are normally amazing, with the weather as it was it was impressive.

Obligatory selfie

The Bruce

Robert the Bruce King of Scots 1274 – 1329 was a classical Scots hero and no friend of an Englishman, below is a photo of his statue at the Bannockburn heritage site near Stirling. Taken on a very early and cold morning, in the hope of catching a nice sunrise with the statue in a good position, as it turned out although fairly short-lived, the sunrise was extraordinary!

The Bruce

The Glencoe Experiance!

The waters which tumble from these high mountains and give rise to a series of spectacular waterfalls gather initially at the ‘Meeting of the Three Waters’ to form the River Coe. Less than a mile lower down, at the very heart of Glencoe, the river widens briefly to form the sombre yet beautifully situated Loch Achtriochtan.

Meeting of the 3 Waters

The mountains of Glencoe are built from some of the oldest sedimentary and volcanic strata in the world. They were subsequently moulded, sheared and repositioned by a geological event known as a ‘cauldron subsidence’ which took place 380 million years ago.

The mountains which first greet the visitor arriving from the south are the strikingly beautiful and instantly recognisable peaks of the Buachaille Etive Mor and Buachaille Etive Beag, – ‘The great’ and ‘The little’ Herdsmen of Etive. Magnificent though they may be, neither of these mountains is the reigning peak of the Glen or the district. That distinction belongs to the peak of Bidean nam Bian; whose main summit is hidden above and behind its more famous outliers, three great-truncated spurs known as ‘The Three Sisters of Glencoe’.

The Falls

Braan falls can be found near Dunkeld in Scotland, just along the road from and another impressive fall at the Hermitage, this image is of the falls just before the run under an old stone bridge into a deep gorge. It quite an impressive area altogether.

The falls at Braan water

The bridge this river flows under is known locally as the “Rumbling Bridge” when you stand on it with the water in full flow you understand why!

Coming Home

Coming Home

On a visit to beautiful Anstruther in Fife, we saw a group of rowers returning from a training exercise , the waters within the harbour were fairly calm but outside it looked to be a lot choppier and must have taken some strength to row through those seas! time to come in for a nice cuppa I think.

Anstruther is a great picturesque little village on the east coast of Fife, well worth a visit for the scenery and the famous Fish and Chips served there, not to be missed!


Castle in the mist

Emerging from the morning mist and taken from the Wallace monument, the sun rising from the left has enhanced the colours of the Great hall. I had set out at silly o’clock in the morning to drive to Stirling (about 40 min) to catch the sunrise over the castle from below, unfortunately, the mist was so thick from below that the castle couldn’t be seen at all!

Castle Mist
Stirling Castle in mist
Stirling Castle

I hastily relocated to the nearby Wallace monument, which was a fairly steep hike uphill in order to get there in time for sunrise and hopefully above the mist layer. I got there just in time to capture a fairly brief moment (a few minutes really) where the sun hit the Queens Chapel.